Tag Archives: Stafford Concealed Carry

Glock 43 Review

7-26-2015 10-51-59 PMI don’t do gun reviews because, well, because I don’t do gun reviews. I generally don’t have the opportunity to get an advanced look and the latest and greatest products before they come to market so by the time I’ve shot it and write the review, 100 others have already done so. Plus, I focus more on the practical aspects of the armed citizen genre than which company makes the best gear for a particular application.

Well today I’m going to break a bit from tradition and give you my thoughts on the latest offering from one of the premier firearms manufactures in the world, Glock, in particular, the new Glock 43. The 43 is the follow up to last years G42 which is chambered in .380 ACP.

The G43 is a single stack, 9mm slim line semi-automatic pistol that looks strangely similar to its little big brother, the G26, also 9mm.  (Yeah, I know, all Glocks look the same.)  I have carried the G26, both as a primary off-duty weapon, and as an on-duty back-up. My primary on-duty, and the Glock model learned on, is the G21 chambered in .45 ACP. When my department finally decided to let officers carry a back-up weapon, I decided on the G26, which while on duty I carry in an ankle holster.

After running thousands of rounds through the full sized G21, I found it difficult to transition with any degree of acceptable proficiency to the sub-compact G26. After many hours of practice to include live and dry fire, I became very proficient with the small gun and have grown to like shooting it very much. With that said, for me at least, the G26 is at the lower limit of what I find comfortable to shoot and couldn’t image going any smaller for a self-defense firearm.7-26-2015 10-53-50 PM

My initial concern with the G43 is that it smaller size would make it difficult for me to accurately shoot and uncomfortable to hold. I really had no interest in shooting it because of this bias until a colleague of mine told me that he had just purchased one as a back-up and loved it. This colleague is will over 6 feet tall and north of 300 pounds with meat hooks for hands. I am of average size so I figured, if the big guy had no issues handling the new Glock, I should at least give it a shot. (Pun intended)

In short, I absolutely loved shooting the Glock 43. To me the gun handles like a dream with very manageable recoil, even when shooting duty rounds, and a crisp, familiar trigger pull that reminded me of all of my other Glock pistols. As far as accuracy goes, I found the G43 to be as accurate as anything else I have ever shot inside 15 yards. While I did not go beyond that range, my colleague did take it out to 25 yards and reports no issues with putting accurate, threat stopping shots on target.

I have shot several of the Glock models over the years to include the G18 in full auto (Yeah, it was friggin awesome!) and I would say that the Glock 43 is as good as any of them in every way. Where the G43 shines is in its concealability, especially with the ladies and as a back-up weapon.  It fits nicely in an ankle holster, purse or even your pocket.  While some will say that the 6+1 ammunition capacity is lacking, it is comparable to other single stack 9’s currently available and is one or two better than many revolvers of comparable size.  If 7 rounds doesn’t do it for you, toss an additional mag in your pocket.  The G43 magazine comes with a standard baseplate as will as an extended version to support your little finger, however, it does not add any additional ammunition capacity to the gun.

In conclusion, the Glock 43 is more than worthy to be included in the Glock Perfection lineup and fits in nicely with the other Glock pistols currently in use today. Glock has been extremely successful over the last 30 years by creating quality and reliable firearms that have been used all over the world to save lives. The G43 is yet another addition to the Glock line of firearms which will, I have no doubt, protect and defend many more lives in the decades to come.

Glock 43 SPECIFICATIONS

Caliber – 9mm
Ammunition Capacity – 6+1
Overall Length – 159mm / 6.20in
Slide Length – 154mm / 6.06in
Length Between Sights – 132mm / 5.20in
Weight w/Empty Magazine – 509g / 17.95oz
Width – 26mm / 1.02in
Slide Width – 22mm / .87in
Height – 108mm / 4.25in

Don’t just survive, thrive!

Dennis

Carrying a firearm for personal protection brings with it an awesome responsibility. You have the power to change a person’s world forever, and even the power to take their life. It is you duty as a responsible gun owner to always obey the cardinal rules of firearms safety and to understand the laws where you live and travel with your gun. Do your due diligence become educated on the use of force continuum and become proficient with your firearm before you leave home.

Click here to learn more about the course we offer.

Self-Defense Long Range Pistol Shooting

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 5.00.51 PMIf you have done your homework on self-defense shootings, be it the police or a civilian doing the shooting, you know that most armed encounters occur at close range.  In fact, the vast majority occur at what is commonly referred to as “conversational distance.”  Bad guys know, and it makes perfect sense, that getting in close before announcing their attack gives them a tactical advantage.  The bad guy gets close before he attacks thereby drastically reducing the time a vicim has to react and put up a defense.  Because of this, most of us practice our defensive shooting tactics at close range.

Now, I ‘m a big proponent of practicing defensive shooting tactics up close because while it should be easier to shoot a target at close range, it becomes more difficult to draw your firearm from concealment when in a hurry.  At close range you may only have a very short period of time to get the gun out of the holster and put an accurate shot on target, especially if the bad guy is so close that you are forced to fight him off with one hand while trying to draw with the other.

But what if the bad guy isn’t up close and personal, what if he is across the parking lot or down a long hall?  Im talking about a bad guy with a rifle who begins shooting 35, 50, 75 or even 100 yards away from you.  If you aren’t the intended target yet, maybe said bad guy is just randomly shooting people, you could turn and high tail it to safety and nobody would fault you for it, or, you could elect to try and put a stop to the shooting spree before it claims more lives.

What if the  bad guy isn’t your garden variety violent offender or nut job, maybe he is a terrorist with a bomb strapped to his chest.  In that scenario, you aren’t going to want to get up close to take him out, you will want to do it at the longest distance possible.  Unless you carry a rifle with you all day, a pistol will probably be your only option in either scenario.

A 100 yard shot with a pistol isn’t as easy as point shooting is from 3 yards, but it is certainly doable.  It’s also a different kind of shooting.  While any real world shooting, meaning, your target is a bad guy and is most likely shooting back,  should be considered “combat shooting,” at conversational distance you will most likely be point shooting.  At long distance, this isn’t an option.  Long distance shooting has more in common with target shooting than combat shooting.  This means you will have to take your time, line up the shot, control your breathing and press the trigger without disturbing the sights.

Typically, the longer the shot, the more time that is needed to make the an accurate shot and the more you need to be paying attention to your breathing.

A  long distance shot incorporates all the same fundamentals of shooting that you have practiced like trigger control and sight alignment, but with a few others.  Firstly, most of us will require a supported position to make a shot with a pistol that far.  The hood of a car, a table or the frame of a door will work.  Your trigger control will have to be spot on.  Any movement of the trigger that moves the sights, even a fraction of an inch can result in a miss.  At long distances, moving the sights will exaggerate an off target shot.  Move the sights slightly at 7 yards will generally result in a hit, at 100 yards, not likely.

Lastly, as a bullet travels from the muzzle of your gun to the target, the bullet will be affected by gravity causing it to drop.  Not at issue up close but depending on the distance to the target, it will be a big issue.  So it is important to know how far it will drop at a given distance and with a given ammunition.   Your gun, it’s caliber and the ammunition weight and makeup will play a role in how far the bullet will drop.  Oh, and don’t forget that the wind will also play a role, a major role in fact on the flight of the bullet.

Because there is a possibility that you may be called on someday to make a long distance shot with your pistol, acquiring the skills and knowledge necessary to do so is critical to your success.  While I don’t do it on a regular basis, I do on occasion set up a target 50 or 100 yards out and practice making the shot with my everyday carry pistol.  In doing so, I know that I and my equipment are capable of putting hits on target at those distances.  Should I be called on to do so, I am confident that I at the very least have a fighting  chance at ending a gun fight or taking out a terrorist at distance.  Of course, at the range the targets don’t generally shot back or blow up.

Don’t just survive, thrive!

Dennis

Carrying a firearm for personal protection brings with it an awesome responsibility. You have the power to change a person’s world forever, and even the power to take their life. It is you duty as a responsible gun owner to always obey the cardinal rules of firearms safety and to understand the laws where you live and travel with your gun. Do your due diligence become educated on the use of force continuum and become proficient with your firearm before you leave home.

If you have doubts about hitting a target with a pistol at long distances, check out the video below of Instructor Zero hitting a target at 300m with a Glock 9mm.

 

Fit to Win?

Screen Shot 2015-01-23 at 11.40.13 PMThere are many aspects that go in to your ability to win a fight.  When we prepare our personal protection plan, we give a lot of thought to things like firearm selection, ammunition ballistics, holster construction and clothing that best conceals our weapon.  All of these things are important considerations, but unfortunately, one very important component is often forgotten, fitness.  Yes, fitness is a very important aspect to any personal protection plan and should not be overlooked.

Generally speaking, being physically fit means that you are healthy.  If you are the type who takes care of yourself by eating right and exercising regularly, you will have a tactical advantage over the person who does not take an active role in their health.  You will be stronger, more flexible, possess better hand-eye coordination, be faster, have more aerobic stamina and be less likely to suffer an injury during a fight.  In the end, your body will be able to function at a higher level than the average bad guy who may be an alcohol or drug abuser, a smoker or somebody who is generally lazy about physical activity.Screen Shot 2015-01-23 at 11.48.37 PM

Most of your garden variety bad guys will fall into the category of poor health, however, more times than not, most bad guys will be young adult males.  Even without paying much attention to fitness, a young adult male is generally more physically capable than the average women or the average male in his 30’s, 40’s or 50’s.  Any added advantage you can get by taking proactive steps to improve your health will be to your advantage.

Without getting into the particulars, I suggest a mixture of aerobic and strength training as well as exercises to improve hand-eye coordination and grip strength.  Yoga and Zumba have their place in a good fitness plan, but adding strength training utilizing free weights is a must.  Yoga isn’t going to help you as you trying to fight off a bad guy long enough to get to your firearm.  Only strength training will.

So, as if you need another excuse to get off the couch and get moving, add surviving an attack by a highly motivated 19 year old male determined to take your life to the list.

Don’t just survive, thrive!

Dennis

Carrying a firearm for personal protection brings with it an awesome responsibility. You have the power to change a person’s world forever, and even the power to take their life. It is you duty as a responsible gun owner to always obey the cardinal rules of firearms safety and to understand the laws where you live and travel with your gun. Do your due diligence become educated on the use of force continuum and become proficient with your firearm before you leave home.